test


Plastics Fume Control

Featured below is Sentry Air Systems' extensive line of Plastics Fume Extractors. These units are designed to be utilized as a respiratory safety engineering control during a variety of plastic manufacturing applications, including injection molding, extrusion, system purging and maintenance, finishing applications and much more. Available configurations include portable extractors with self-supportive flex arms, extractors with flexible "python" hose, multi-operator extractors, downdraft bench assemblies and ceiling-mounted ambient air cleaners. The majority of these fume control extraction systems are ductless and recirculating, so they require no exterior venting or exhaust. Filtration media options include HEPA and other pleated media, Activated Carbon, and Specialty-blended carbon filter media. Click on the individual products below for detailed information, technical specifications, and the option to Request a Quote or more information.

Plastics Overview

According to the Society of the Plastics Industry (SPI), the US plastics industry:
Is the third largest manufacturing industry in the US
Employs nearly 900,000 workers
Has nearly 18,500 plastics facilities in the US

Most commonly used plastic polymers:
Acrylic
Acrylonitrile-buadiene-styrene ABS
Epoxy
Melamine
Phenolics
Polyamide
Polycarbonate
Polyester
Polyethlene Terephthalate
Polyethylene
Polypropylene
Polystyrene
Polyurethane
Polyvinyl Chloride
Styrene-Acrylonitrile

Health Hazards

Hazardous contaminants include
Acrylonitrile-butadienestyrene
Bisphenol A
Cyanide
Formaldehyde
Hydrogen Chloride
Isocyanates
Nitrogen compounds
Polyvinyl chloride
Styrene 
Various additives including plasticizers, stabilizers, pigments, flame retardants, activators, lubricants, fillers, metals, and solvents

Activities that may release contaminants:
Injection Molding
Extrusion
Blow Molding
Calendaring
Compression Molding
Finishing Processes
Purging and Maintenance

Possible health effects from plastics manufacture:
Vinyl chloride is classified by the International Agency for the Research on Cancer (IARC) as carcinogenic to humans.
Styrene is classified by IARC as possibly carcinogenic to humans. It also acts as an endocrine disrupter.
Acrylonitrile is classified by IARC as possibly carcinogenic to humans. In addition, it is linked to genital abnormalities in children born to exposed mothers and may have endocrine-disrupting effects. Acrylonitrile is also linked to an increase in lymphocyte counts, severe liver damage, lung cancer, and increased chromosomal aberrations in exposed workers.
Human BPA studies identify adverse effects in women with a high BPA body burden such as: recurrent miscarriages, ovarian cysts, obesity, and endometriosis.
IARC has classified formaldehyde as a human carcinogen. It was linked to an increase in breast cancer risk in a 1995 study of industrial workers; similar results were found in other international studies.
The following additives are of concern due to their potential link to cancer and endocrine disruption: Phthalates, metals (inorganic lead compounds, cadmium, organic tin compounds, barium, calcium, zinc carboxylates, and antimony compounds), flame retardants (organohalogen and organophosphorus-containing compounds, polybrominated biphenyls and polybrominated diphenyl ethers)
Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons have been identified as mammary carcinogens in animal testing. Benzo(a)pyrene, one of the PAHs produced when combustion is incomplete, has been identified by IARC as carcinogenic to humans.
Benzene, methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) and toluene have been found to cause mammary tumors in animals. Many of these solvents are also considered to be endocrine disrupters.
Legionnaires' Disease - Workers engaged in the manufacture of plastic parts using injection molding equipment may be at an increased risk for Legionnaires' Disease (LD), a potentially life-threatening form of pneumonia. LD may be contracted by exposure and inhalation to water and water mists containing elevated concentrations of Legionella and Legionella Pneumophila. These organisms have been found in the water used to cool the metal molds and the process equipment used during the manufacture of plastic parts.

Workplace Exposure Limits

OSHA Act of 1970 General Duty Clause
OSHA Respiratory Protection Standard 1910.134

Workplace Exposure Limits:

Name

OSHA PEL

Cal/OSHA PEL

NIOSH REL

ACGIH TLV

Acrylonitrile

2 ppm

2 ppm

1 ppm

2 ppm

Barium

0.5 mg/m3

0.5 mg/m3

0.5 mg/m3

0.5 mg/m3

Benzene

1 ppm

1 ppm

0.1 ppm

0.5 ppm

Biphenyl

1 mg/m3

1 mg/m3

1 mg/m3

1 mg/m3

Butadiene

1 ppm

1 ppm

None

2 ppm

Methyl Ethyl Ketone

200 ppm

200 ppm

200 ppm

200 ppm

Cadmium

0.005 mg/m3

0.005 mg/m3

None

0.01 mg/m3

Calcium oxide

5 mg/m3

2 mg/m3

2 mg/m3

2 mg/m3

Cyanide

5 mg/m3

5 mg/m3

5 mg/m3

5 mg/m3

Formaldehyde

0.75 ppm

0.75 ppm

0.016 ppm

0.3 ppm

Hydrogen Chloride

5 ppm

5 ppm

5 ppm

2 ppm

Inorganic Lead

0.05 mg/m3

0.05 mg/m3

0.05 mg/m3

0.05 mg/m3

Oil Mist

5 mg/m3

5 mg/m3

5 mg/m3

5 mg/m3

Particulates Not Regulated

15 mg/m3

10 mg/m3

None

10 mg/m3

Phenol

5 ppm

5 ppm

5 ppm

5 ppm

Styrene

100 ppm

50 ppm

50 ppm

20 ppm

Organic Tin

0.1 mg/m3

0.1 mg/m3

0.1 mg/m3

0.1 mg/m3

Toluene

200 ppm

10 ppm

100 ppm

20 ppm

Vinyl Chloride

1 ppm

1 ppm

1 ppm

1 ppm

Zinc

5 mg/m3

5 mg/m3

5 mg/m3

5 mg/m3

  • Plastics Fume Extractor
  • Plastics Fume Extractor
  • Plastics Fume Extractor
  • Plastics Fume Extractor